terrible-dinosaurThe name dinosaur comes from the Greek words deinos (“terrible” or “fearfully great”) and sauros (“reptile” or “lizard”). The English anatomist Richard Owen proposed the formal term Dinosauria in 1842 to include three giant extinct animals (Megalosaurus, Iguanodon, and Hylaeosaurus) represented by large fossilized bones that had been unearthed at several locations in southern England during the early part of the 19th century. Owen recognized that these reptiles were far different from other known reptiles of the present and the past for three reasons: they were large yet obviously terrestrial, unlike the aquatic ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs that were already known; they had five vertebrae in their hips, whereas most known reptiles have only two; and, rather than holding their limbs sprawled out to the side in the manner of lizards, dinosaurs held their limbs under the body in columnar fashion, like elephants and other large mammals.

Originally applied to just a handful of incomplete specimens, the category Dinosauria now encompasses more than 800 generic names and at least 1,000 species, with new names being added to the roster every year as the result of scientific explorations around the world. Not all of these names are valid taxa, however.
A great many of them have been based on fragmentary or incomplete material that may actually have come from two or more different dinosaurs. In addition, bones have sometimes been misidentified as dinosaurian when they are fearfully-great-dinosaurnot from dinosaurs at all. Nevertheless, dinosaurs are well documented by abundant fossil remains recovered from every continent on Earth, and the number of known dinosaurian taxa is estimated to be 10–25 percent of actual past diversity.

The extensive fossil record of genera and species is testimony that dinosaurs were diverse animals, with widely varying lifestyles and adaptations. Their remains are found in sedimentary rock layers (strata) dating to the Late Triassic Period (227 million to 206 million years ago). The abundance of their fossilized bones is substantive proof that dinosaurs were the dominant form of terrestrial animal life during the Mesozoic Era (248 million to 65 million years ago). It is likely that the known remains represent a very small fraction (probably less than 0.0001 percent) of all the individual dinosaurs that once lived.

Before Richard Owen introduced the term Dinosauria in 1842, there was no concept of anything even like a dinosaur. Large fossilized bones quite probably had been observed long before that time, but there is little record—and no existing specimens—of such findings much before 1818. In any case, people could not have been expected to understand what dinosaurs were even if they found their remains. For example, some classical scholars now conclude that the Greco-Roman legends of griffins from the 7th century bc were inspired by discoveries of protoceratopsian dinosaurs in the Altai region of Mongolia. In 1676 Robert Plot of the University of Oxford included, in a work of natural history, a drawing of what was apparently the knee-end of the thigh bone of a dinosaur, which he thought might have come from an elephant taken to Britain in Roman times. Fossil bones of what were undoubtedly dinosaurs were discovered in New Jersey in the late 1700s and were probably discussed at the meetings of the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. Soon thereafter, Lewis and Clark’s expedition encountered dinosaur fossils in the western United States.

The earliest verifiable published record of dinosaur remains that still exists is a note in the 1820 American Journal of Science and Arts by Nathan Smith. The bones described had been found in 1818 by Solomon Ellsworth, Jr., while he was digging a well at his homestead in Windsor, Connecticut. At the time, the bones were thought to be human, but much later they were identified as Anchisaurus. Even earlier (1800), large birdlike footprints had been noticed on sandstone slabs in Massachusetts. Pliny Moody, who discovered these tracks, attributed them to “Noah’s raven,” and Edward Hitchcock of Amherst College, who began collecting them in 1835, considered them to be those of some giant extinct bird. The tracks are now recognized as having been made by several different kinds of dinosaurs, and such tracks are still commonplace in the Connecticut River Valley today.

Better known are the finds in southern England during the early 1820s by William Buckland (a clergyman) and Gideon Mantell (a physician), who described Megalosaurus and Iguanodon, respectively. In 1824 Buckland published a description of Megalosaurus, fossils of which consisted mainly of a lower jawbone with a few teeth. The following year Mantell published his “Notice on the Iguanodon, a Newly Discovered Fossil Reptile, from the Sandstone of Tilgate Forest, in Sussex,” on the basis of several teeth and some leg bones. Both men collected fossils as an avocation and are credited with the earliest published announcements in England of what later would be recognized as dinosaurs. In both cases their finds were too fragmentary to permit a clear image of either animal. In 1834 a partial skeleton was found near Brighton that corresponded with Mantell’s fragments from Tilgate Forest. It became known as the Maidstone Iguanodon, after the village where it was discovered. The Maidstone skeleton provided the first glimpse of what these creatures might have looked like.

Two years before the Maidstone Iguanodon came to light, a different kind of skeleton was found in the Weald of southern England. It was described and named Hylaeosaurus by Mantell in 1832 and later proved to be one of the armoured dinosaurs. Other fossil bones began turning up in Europe: fragments described and named as Thecodontosaurus and Palaeosaurus by two English students, Henry Riley and Samuel Stutchbury, and the first of many skeletons named Plateosaurus by the naturalist Hermann von Meyer in 1837. Richard Owen identified two additional dinosaurs, albeit from fragmentary evidence: Cladeiodon, which was based on a single large tooth, and Cetiosaurus, which he named from an incomplete skeleton composed of very large bones. Having carefully studied most of these fossil specimens, Owen recognized that all of these bones represented a group of large reptiles that were unlike any living varieties. In a report to the British Association for the Advancement of Science in 1841, he described these animals, and the word Dinosauria was first published in the association’s proceedings in 1842. — www.britannica.com